Who married Salonia?

Cato the Elder married Salonia .

Salonia

Salonia was a Roman slave, and later freedwoman who lived during the mid-2nd century BC, and who was the second wife of Cato the Elder. She was the young daughter of the slave Salonius who was an under-secretary to Cato the Elder. Following the death of his first wife, Cato began taking solace with a slave girl who secretly visited his bed.

However, his son Marcus Porcius Cato Licinianus and his son's wife disapproved of the relationship, so Cato decided to marry Salonia in order to solve the problem. However, when Licinianus found out about it he complained that now his problem was with his father's marriage to Salonia. Cato replied that he loved his son, and for that reason, wished to have more sons like him.

In 154 BC, Salonia gave birth to Marcus Porcius Cato Salonianus who was only five when his father died. Through her son, Salonia was grandmother of Lucius Porcius Cato and Marcus Porcius Cato, the great-grandmother of Cato the Younger, and the great-great-grandmother of Marcus Porcius Cato, who died at the Battle of Philippi and Porcia Catonis, who was married to Marcus Junius Brutus.

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Wedding Rings

Cato the Elder

Cato the Elder

Cato the Elder (; Latin: Cato Major; 234–149 BC), born Marcus Porcius Cato and also known as Cato the Censor (Cato Censorius), Cato the Wise (Cato Sapiens), and Cato the Ancient (Cato Priscus), was a Roman soldier, senator and historian known for his conservatism and opposition to Hellenization. He was the first to write history in Latin.

He came from an ancient Plebeian family who were noted for their military service. Like his forefathers, Cato was devoted to agriculture when not serving in the army. Having attracted the attention of Lucius Valerius Flaccus, he was brought to Rome and began to follow the cursus honorum: he was successively military tribune (214 BC), quaestor (204 BC), aedile (199 BC), praetor (198 BC), junior consul (195 BC) together with Flaccus, and censor (184 BC). As praetor, he expelled usurers from Sardinia. As censor, he tried to save Rome's ancestral customs and combat "degenerate" Hellenistic influences. His epithet "Elder" distinguishes him from his equally famous great-grandson Cato the Younger, who opposed Julius Caesar.

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