Who married Matilda of Hainaut?

Guy II de la Roche married Matilda of Hainaut .

John of Gravina married Matilda of Hainaut .

Louis of Burgundy married Matilda of Hainaut .

Matilda of Hainaut

Matilda of Hainaut

Matilda of Hainaut (29 November 1293 – 1331) was the Princess of Achaea from 1313 to 1318. She was the daughter of Isabella of Villehardouin and her husband Florent of Hainaut.

In 1299, while still a child, she had been married to Guy II de la Roche, Duke of Athens. Widowed in 1308, she was engaged to Charles of Taranto until 1313, when she remarried to Louis of Burgundy, who held the titular dignity of the long-extinct Kingdom of Thessalonica. The marriage was intended to unite the Angevin and Burgundian houses. So was the betrothal of the Empress Catherine II to Hugh V of Burgundy, Louis's elder brother. However, Charles of Valois, Catherine's father, nixed the marriage and instead married her to Philip of Taranto. It was in an effort to compensate the Burgundians that Philip renounced his claim to Achaea in favour of Matilda and gave her hand to Louis.

From 1307, when Philip of Savoy relinquished his claim, to 1312, when Isabella of Villehardouin died, Achaea was disputed between two claimants: Isabella and Philip I of Taranto. In 1313, Philip granted it to Matilda, daughter of Isabella and her first husband Florent of Hainaut. On Isabella's death, however, Ferdinand of Majorca laid claim to the principality in right of his wife, Isabella of Sabran, the daughter of Isabella's younger sister Margaret of Villehardouin.

The new couple quickly left for Greece to take possession of their fief, which was then occupied by their rival Ferdinand. At the Battle of Manolada on 5 July 1316, Ferdinand was vanquished and killed and Louis took control of the Elis. However, he was poisoned soon after, leaving a twice-widowed 23-year-old in charge of the Morea. It was soon disputed by the varying claimants and Matilda was solidly dispossessed of her fief by 1318, in which year John, Duke of Durazzo, an Angevin, abducted the princess and forced her to marry him. She did not give him children, however, and he repudiated her in 1321. Matilda married yet again to Hugh de La Palice and retired to Aversa, where she died in 1331.

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Guy II de la Roche

Guy II de la Roche

Guy II de la Roche, also known as Guyot or Guidotto (1280 – 5 October 1308), was the Duke of Athens from 1287, the last duke of his family. He succeeded as a minor on the death of his father, William I, at a time when the duchy of Athens had exceeded the Principality of Achaea in wealth, power, and importance.

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Matilda of Hainaut

Matilda of Hainaut
 
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John of Gravina

John of Gravina

John of Gravina (1294 – 5 April 1336), Count of Gravina 1315–1336, Prince of Achaea 1318-1332, Duke of Durazzo 1332–1336 and ruler of the Kingdom of Albania (although he never used a royal title), was a younger son of Charles II of Naples and Maria of Hungary.

He was a younger brother of (among others) Charles Martel of Anjou, Saint Louis of Toulouse, Robert of Naples and Philip I of Taranto.

On 3 September 1313 he was named Captain-General of Calabria. In 1315, he succeeded his brother Peter, Count of Gravina after the latter was killed at the Battle of Montecatini.

The death of Louis of Burgundy in 1316 widowed Matilda of Hainaut, Princess of Achaea. Her suzerain, John's brother Philip I of Taranto, had her brought by force to Naples in 1318 to marry John, a design intended to bring the Principality of Achaea into the Angevin inheritance. The marriage, celebrated in March 1318, failed of its objective: Matilda refused to surrender her rights to Achaea to her husband and ultimately contracted a secret marriage with Hugh de La Palice. This violated the marriage contract of her mother Isabelle, which had pledged that Isabelle and all her female heirs should not marry without permission of their suzerain. On these grounds, Philip stripped her of Achaea and bestowed it upon John: the marriage was annulled for non-consummation, and Matilda was imprisoned in the Castel dell'Ovo.

On 14 November 1321, John took a second wife, Agnes of Périgord, daughter of Helie VII, Count of Périgord and Brunissende de Foix. They had three sons:

  • Charles, Duke of Durazzo (1323–1348). Married Maria of Calabria.
  • Louis of Durazzo (1324–1362), Count of Gravina
  • Robert of Durazzo (1326–1356)

In a tardy reaction to the Byzantine advances in the central Morea, in 1325 John launched a military expedition, financed by the Acciaiuoli, to Achaea. While he re-established his authority in Cefaphonia and Zante, he was unable to recapture Skorta from the control of the Byzantine Empire.

In 1332, Philip of Taranto died and was succeeded by his son Robert of Taranto, who became the new suzerain of Achaea. Not wishing to swear fealty to his nephew, John arranged to surrender Achaea to him in exchange for Robert's rights to the Kingdom of Albania and a loan of 5,000 ounces of gold raised upon Niccolo Acciaiuoli, and thenceforth adopted the style of "Duke of Durazzo".

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Matilda of Hainaut

Matilda of Hainaut
 
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Louis of Burgundy

Louis of Burgundy

Louis of Burgundy (1297 – August 2, 1316), Prince of Achaea and titular King of Thessalonica, was a younger son of Robert II, Duke of Burgundy and Agnes of France.

In 1313, he took part in a complex marriage pact designed to secure control by the Angevins and the Burgundians over Frankish Greece. On July 31, 1313, he married Matilda of Hainaut, heir-general of William II Villehardouin, to whom Philip I of Taranto gave the Principality of Achaea in fief. Louis ceded his claims on the family lands in Burgundy to his elder brother, Hugh V, Duke of Burgundy, who in turn ceded to Louis the title of "King of Thessalonica," which had been sold to their family in 1266. He subsequently did homage to Philip of Taranto, who was suzerain of Achaea and, as titular Latin Emperor jure uxoris, his overlord as King of Thessalonica, and agreed to assist in a campaign to recapture the Latin Empire.

Matilda and Louis arrived separately in Achaea, she sailing directly from Marseille to Navarino with 1,000 troops, while Louis came by way of Venice, where he was soliciting aid from the Republic. Ferdinand of Majorca, who also claimed the principality jure uxoris (his wife Isabelle de Sabran was descended from the younger daughter of William II Villehardouin), had landed there in 1315 and taken to Glarentza. Matilda arrived late in 1315, and several barons, including the count of Cephalonia returned to her allegiance. However, her army was beaten by Ferdinand and his Catalans on February 22, 1316 at Picotin. About this time, Louis arrived, making an unsuccessful attempt to capture the castle of Chalandritsa. Ferdinand sent for aid from the Kingdom of Majorca and the Catalan Company, but neither arrived in time to prevent his death and defeat by Louis at the Battle of Manolada on July 5, 1316. Four weeks later, Louis died. The Chronicle of the Morea attributes his death to a fever, while the Catalan Declaratio summa states that he was poisoned by John, count of Cephalonia. His death left Achaea in an unsettled state, with his brother Eudes, his wife, and the Angevins all attempting to gain it.

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Father of Matilda of Hainaut and his spouses: