Who married Madeleine Carroll?

Andrew Heiskell married Madeleine Carroll 1950.

Henri Lavorel married Madeleine Carroll 1946.

Sterling Hayden married Madeleine Carroll 1942.

Madeleine Carroll

Madeleine Carroll

Edith Madeleine Carroll (26 February 1906 – 2 October 1987) was an English actress, popular both in Britain and America in the 1930s and 1940s. At the peak of her success she was the highest-paid actress in the world, earning $250,000 in 1938.

Carroll is remembered for her role in Alfred Hitchcock's The 39 Steps (1935). She is also noted for abandoning her acting career after the death of her sister Marguerite in the London Blitz, to devote herself to helping wounded servicemen and children displaced and maimed by the war.

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Wedding Rings

Andrew Heiskell

Andrew Heiskell

Andrew Heiskell (September 13, 1915, Naples, Italy - July 6, 2003 Darien, Connecticut) was chairman and CEO of Time Inc. (1960–1980), and also known for his philanthropy, for organizations including the New York Public Library. He was President of the Inter American Press Association (1961–1962).

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Madeleine Carroll

Madeleine Carroll
 
Wedding Rings

Henri Lavorel

Henri-Albert-Sylvestre Lavorel was born on 5 July 1914 in Annecy, Haute-Savoie and died in a car accident on 7 January 1955 in Versailles. He was married to the English actress Madeleine Carroll from 1946 to 1949.

He worked as a producer, writer and director, most notably on Le Voyage en Amérique (1951) (writer, producer, director) and C'est arrivé à Paris (1953) (producer, director).

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Madeleine Carroll

Madeleine Carroll
 
Wedding Rings

Sterling Hayden

Sterling Hayden

Sterling Walter Hayden (born Sterling Relyea Walter; March 26, 1916 – May 23, 1986) was an American actor, author, and sailor. A leading man for most of his career, he specialized in westerns and film noir throughout the 1950s, in films such as John Huston's The Asphalt Jungle (1950), Nicholas Ray's Johnny Guitar (1954), and Stanley Kubrick's The Killing (1956). He became noted for supporting roles in the 1960s, perhaps most memorably as General Jack D. Ripper in Kubrick's Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964).

Hayden's success continued into the New Hollywood era, with roles such as Irish-American policeman Captain McCluskey in Francis Ford Coppola's The Godfather (1972), alcoholic novelist Roger Wade in Robert Altman's The Long Goodbye (1973), and elderly peasant Leo Dalcò in Bernardo Bertolucci's 1900 (1976). With a distinctive "rapid-fire baritone" voice and standing at 6 feet 5 inches (1.96 m), he had a commanding screen presence in both leading and supporting roles.

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