Who married Federico Tinoco Granados?

María Fernández de Tinoco married Federico Tinoco Granados .

Federico Tinoco Granados

Federico Tinoco Granados

General José Federico Alberto de Jesús Tinoco Granados (21 November 1868 – 7 September 1931) was a Dictator of Costa Rica from 1917 to 1919.

After a career in the army, he was appointed Minister of War in the cabinet of President Alfredo González. On January 27, 1917 he and his brother José Joaquín seized power in a coup d'état and established a repressive military dictatorship that attempted to crush all opposition. Though his government won support from the upper classes because it turned back the austerity measures adopted by President González, and declared war on the German Empire in May 1918, it failed to win the recognition of the United States, where President Woodrow Wilson supported the deposed government.

Popular sentiment against Tinoco, which began on June 13, 1919, quickly came to a head, and his brother was assassinated in early August. On August 13 Tinoco resigned in favor of Juan Bautista Quirós and went into exile in Europe. He died in Paris in 1931.

Due to a dispute over the legitimacy of the government of Tinoco, Costa Rica was not a party to the Treaty of Versailles and did not unilaterally end the state of war between itself and Germany. The technical state of war ended after World War II only after they were included in the Potsdam Agreement. Costa Rica did not issue a declaration of war against Germany in World War II.

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Wedding Rings

María Fernández de Tinoco

María Fernández de Tinoco

María Fernández de Tinoco (22 January 1877-23 November 1961) was a Costa Rican writer and amateur archaeologist who became the First Lady of Costa Rica in 1917. Educated in England, Fernández studied archaeology, art and music before returning to Costa Rica. Involved in amateur archaeological digs and charitable works, she wrote articles for publication in local newspapers and magazines and published two novels. When her husband staged a coup d'état and was later elected President of Costa Rica, she served as First Lady from 8 June 1917 to 20 August 1919. When he resigned from his post due to mismanagement, the couple moved to Paris, where she participated in archeological and artistic works until his death in 1931. From 1932 to 1934, she resided in Norway before returning to Costa Rica, where she resumed her archeological studies and publishing, while working for the National Museum of Costa Rica. Involved with the Red Cross, she was awarded the Florence Nightingale Medal in 1949 and in 2012, the Ministry of Culture of Costa Rica produced a documentary about her life.

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