Who married Emperor Yuan of Liang?

Empress Dowager Xia married Emperor Yuan of Liang .

Hong Yezhu married Emperor Yuan of Liang .

Princess Xu Zhaopei married Emperor Yuan of Liang .

Emperor Yuan of Liang

Emperor Yuan of Liang

Emperor Yuan of Liang (Chinese: 梁元帝; pinyin: Liáng Yuándì) (16 September 508 – 27 January 555), personal name Xiao Yi (蕭繹), courtesy name Shicheng (世誠), nickname Qifu (七符), was an emperor of the Chinese Liang Dynasty. After his father Emperor Wu and brother Emperor Jianwen were successively taken hostage and controlled by the rebel general Hou Jing, Xiao Yi was largely viewed as the de facto leader of Liang, and after defeating Hou in 552 declared himself emperor. In 554, after offending Yuwen Tai, the paramount general of rival Western Wei, Western Wei forces descended on and captured his capital Jiangling (江陵, in modern Jingzhou, Hubei), executing him and instead declaring his nephew Xiao Cha (Emperor Xuan) the Emperor of Liang.

Emperor Yuan was a renowned writer and collector of ancient books, but was criticized by historians for concentrating on eliminating potential contenders for the throne rather than on fighting Hou Jing. As Jiangling was besieged by Western Wei troops, Emperor Yuan set his collection of more than 140,000 volumes of ancient books on fire, and this is commonly considered as one of the greatest disasters for the study of ancient works in Chinese history.

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Empress Dowager Xia

Empress Dowager Xia (夏太后), possibly Xia Wangfeng (夏王豐), was an empress dowager of the Chinese Liang dynasty. She was the mother of Emperor Jing (Xiao Fangzhi).

The future Empress Dowager Xia was from Kuaiji Commandery on the southern shore of Hangzhou Bay. Sometime between 520 and 527, she became a concubine of Xiao Yi the Prince of Xiangdong, a son of Liang's founder Emperor Wu. In 544, she bore him a son, Xiao Fangzhi. After Xiao Yi declared himself emperor in 552 (as Emperor Yuan), he created Xiao Fangzhi the Prince of Jin'an, and he honored Consort Xia as the Princess Dowager of Jin'an. She also carried the imperial consort rank guifei (貴妃), the first rank among imperial consort. After Emperor Yuan was captured and killed by Western Wei in 554, Xiao Fangzhi was declared emperor by the general Chen Baxian in 555. Princess Dowager Xia was honored as empress dowager. However, Chen controlled the government, and in 557 he forced Emperor Jing to yield the throne to him, establishing the Chen dynasty (as its Emperor Wu). Emperor Jing was created the Prince of Jiangyin, and Empress Dowager Xia thus became the Princess Dowager of Jiangyin. Chen Baxian had Xiao Fangzhi killed in 558, and nothing further was recorded in history about the former empress dowager.

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Emperor Yuan of Liang

Emperor Yuan of Liang
 
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Hong Yezhu

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Emperor Yuan of Liang

Emperor Yuan of Liang
 
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Princess Xu Zhaopei

Princess Xu Zhaopei (徐昭佩) (died 549) was an imperial princess of the Chinese Liang Dynasty. She was the wife of Xiao Yi, Prince of Xiangdong, son of the founding emperor Emperor Wu who later took the throne as Emperor Yuan.

Xu Zhaopei was the granddaughter of the Southern Qi prime minister Xu Xiaosi (徐孝嗣). Her father, Xu Gun (徐緄), was also an important official under Emperor Wu. She married Xiao Yi around the new year 518; thereafter she carried the title Princess of Xiangdong. In the Book of Liang and History of Southern Dynasties, it was said that as her bridal procession neared Xiao Yi's mansion, powerful winds damaged the house, and it snowed so hard that the curtains all turned white, both of which were considered ill signs.

Princess Xu bore Xiao Yi two children—his oldest son and heir apparent Xiao Fangdeng (蕭方等) and a daughter, Xiao Hanzhen (蕭含貞) (the later Princess Yichang). However, the relationship between Xiao Yi and Princess Xu was stormy, and Xiao Yi rarely joined her in bedchambers—only once every two or three years. Each time he did, she humiliated him, however—as Xiao Yi was blind in one eye, she would intentionally put on makeup only on one side of her face and not the other, to parodize him, and he would rush out of her bedchambers when he saw this. She was said to be an alcoholic and jealous. When she knew of Xiao Yi's concubines becoming pregnant, she would try to attack them with swords, and she often drank with the other concubines who were not favored by the prince. She also carried on affairs—initially with the Taoist monk Zhiyuan (智遠), and then later with her husband's associate Ji Jijiang (暨季江) and another man, He Hui (賀徽), and she wrote He poetry. Ji once commented, "Although Lady Xu is old, she is very amorous." This led to the Chinese idiom "the half-old Lady Xu" (徐娘半老, Xu Niang banlao), used to describe a middle-aged or old-aged woman who is considered sexually promiscuous.

Because of the difficult relationship between Xiao Yi and Princess Xu, Xiao Yi also did not favor her son, the Heir Apparent Xiao Fangdeng. In 548, when the capital Jiankang was besieged by the rebel general Hou Jing, Xiao Yi, then the governor of the important Jing Province (荊州, modern central and western Hubei), sent Xiao Fangdeng with a relatively small detachment to assist other generals in trying to relieve Jiankang, but after Hou captured the capital in spring 549, Xiao Fangdeng returned to Xiao Yi's base of Jiangling. When Xiao Yi saw how organized Xiao Fangdeng's troops were, he was greatly pleased, and he entered Princess Xu's bedchambers to tell her of how much he approved of Xiao Fangdeng. Princess Xu, however, inexplicably responded by crying hard. In anger, Xiao Yi wrote extensively about her affairs and posted the writing onto the provincial government walls. (He later also collected these writings in his work Jinlou Zi (金樓子).)

Xiao Fangdeng became fearful of his father's wrath, and in summer 549, when his cousin Xiao Yu (蕭譽) the Prince of Hedong and governor of Xiang Province (湘州, modern central Hunan) refused to follow Xiao Yi's orders, Xiao Fangdeng volunteered to attack Xiao Yu—and made the comment, "I will surely die on this campaign -- but I would have no regrets dying in the right place." Soon, when he engaged Xiao Yu, he was defeated, and he fell into the Xiang River and drowned. When Xiao Yi heard of Xiao Fangdeng's death, he did not mourn Xiao Fangdeng at all, and his relationship with Princess Xu deteriorated even greater after Xiao Fangdeng's death. When his favorite concubine Lady Wang died, he accused Princess Xu of murdering Lady Wang, and ordered her to commit suicide. She killed herself by jumping into a well. Xiao Yi, instead of burying her with honors due a princess, returned her body to the Xu clan, stating that she had become a divorced wife. He also prohibited his sons from mourning her. When he became emperor in 552, he also made no efforts to posthumously honor her.

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Children of Emperor Yuan of Liang and their spouses:

Mother of Emperor Yuan of Liang and her spouses: