Who married Doubravka of Bohemia?

Gunther, Margrave of Merseburg married Doubravka of Bohemia .

Mieszko I married Doubravka of Bohemia 965.

Doubravka of Bohemia

Doubravka of Bohemia

Doubravka of Bohemia (Czech: Doubravka Přemyslovna, Polish: Dobrawa Przemyślidka; ca. 940/45 – 977) was a Bohemian princess of the Přemyslid dynasty and by marriage Duchess of the Polans.

She was the daughter of Boleslaus I the Cruel, Duke of Bohemia, whose wife may have been the mysterious Biagota.

According to earlier sources, Doubravka urged her husband Mieszko I of Poland to accept baptism in 966, the year after their marriage. Modern historians believe, however, that the change of religion by Mieszko was one of the points discussed in the Polish-Bohemian agreement concluded soon before his marriage with Doubravka. Her role in his conversion is not considered now to be as important as it is often represented in medieval chronicles.

 Read more...
 
Wedding Rings

Gunther, Margrave of Merseburg

Gunther (German: Günther) (died 13 July 982) was the Margrave of Merseburg from 965 until his death, upon which the march of Merseburg was united to that of Meissen.

Gunther was a scion of the Ekkeharding noble family first recorded around Naumburg, which may be affiliated with the Ottonian dynasty. In 962, he was already regarded as a margrave in the newly created Diocese of Magdeburg, alongside Count Wigger of Bilstein and Wigbert.

He was appointed to the newly created Merseburger march by Emperor Otto I following the death of Margrave Gero the Great in 965, after which the Marca Geronis was split in several smaller parts. The establishment of the march was followed by the Merseburg diocese under Bishop Boso in 968.

Gunther supported Duke Henry II the Quarrelsome of Bavaria in his revolt against Emperor Otto II and was therefore deposed as margrave and banished in 976, while his march fell to Thietmar of Meissen. Gunther nevertheless became reconciled with Otto II and after Thietmar's death in 979 was reinstalled as margrave.

He joined Otto's campaign in Calabria in 982 and died there in the Battle of Stilo against the Saracens. He was succeeded by Rikdag, who then united the marches of Meissen, Merseburg and Zeitz under his rule.

According to chronicler Thietmar of Merseburg, Gunther may have been married to Dobrawa, daughter of Duke Boleslaus the Cruel of Bohemia and consort of Duke Mieszko I of Poland from 965. He left three sons: Eckard I, who succeededed Rikdag as Margrave of Meissen in 985; Gunzelin of Kuckenburg, who followed his brother in 1002, and Bruno, who defended Meissen against the troops of duke Bolesław I Chrobry of Poland in 1009.

 Read more...
 

Doubravka of Bohemia

Doubravka of Bohemia
 
Wedding Rings

Mieszko I

Mieszko I

Mieszko I (Polish ; c. 930 – 25 May 992) was the ruler of Poland from about 960 until his death. A member of the Piast dynasty, he was a son of Siemomysł, and a grandson of Lestek. He was the father of Bolesław I the Brave (the first crowned king of Poland) and of Gunhild of Wenden. Most sources make Mieszko I the father of Sigrid the Haughty, a Scandinavian queen, though one source identifies her father as Skoglar Toste, and the grandfather of Canute the Great (Gundhild's son), and the great-grandfather of Gunhilda of Denmark, Canute the Great's daughter and wife of Henry III, Holy Roman Emperor.

While he was the first Christian ruler of Poland, he continued the policies of both his father and grandfather, who initiated the process of creation of the Polish state. Through both alliances and the use of military force, Mieszko extended ongoing Polish conquests and early in his reign subjugated Kuyavia and probably Gdańsk Pomerania and Masovia. For most of his reign, Mieszko I was involved in warfare for the control of Western Pomerania, eventually conquering it up to the vicinity of the lower Oder river. During the last years of his life, he fought the Bohemian state, winning Silesia and probably Lesser Poland.

Mieszko I's alliance with the Czech prince, Boleslaus I the Cruel, strengthened by his marriage in 965 to the Czech Přemyslid princess Dobrawa, and his baptism in 966 put him and his country in the cultural sphere of Western Christianity. Apart from the great conquests accomplished during his reign (which proved to be fundamental for the future of Poland) Mieszko I was renowned for his internal reforms, aimed at expanding and improving the so-called war monarchy system.

According to existing sources, Mieszko I was a wise politician, a talented military leader, and a charismatic ruler. He successfully used diplomacy, concluding alliances, first with Bohemia, then Sweden, and the Holy Roman Empire. In foreign policy, he placed the interests of his country foremost, even entering into agreements with his former enemies. On his death, he left to his sons a country with greatly expanded territories, and a well-established position in Europe.

Mieszko I also enigmatically appeared as "Dagome" in a papal document dating to about 1085, called Dagome iudex, which mentions a gift or dedication of Mieszko's land to the Pope (the act took place almost a hundred years earlier).

It is roughly his borders that Poland was returned to in 1945.

 Read more...
 

Father of Doubravka of Bohemia and his spouses:

Mother of Doubravka of Bohemia and her spouses: